Verizon FiOS: 46% of Customers Buy 50 Mbps; 55% of Q4 2013 Sales Were for 50 Mbps or Higher

Though some still argue that the United States is woefully behind in Internet access speeds, the more important part of the story is growth.

By the end of fourth-quarter 2013, 46 percent of Verizon Communications consumer FiOS Internet customers subscribed to FiOS Quantum, which provides speeds ranging from 50 Mbps to 500 Mbps, up from 41 percent at the end of third quarter 2013.

In the fourth quarter of 2013, 55 percent of consumer FiOS Internet sales were for speeds of at least 50 megabits per second.

The availability of 100 Mbps to 1 Gbps Internet access services grew the fastest, from 2010 to 2012, according to the  National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA).

Though growing from a low base, availability of 1-Gbps services grew nearly 300 percent between 2010 and 2012.

Availability fo 100 Mbps services grew even more: 448 percent between 2010 and 2012. Availability of 50 Mbps services grew 160 percent between 2010 and 2012.

Services operating at 25 Mbps, arguably the speeds most consumers tend to buy, grew about 57 percent, in terms of availability.

Up to this point, cable operators have been the primary providers of high speed access services of at least 25 Mbps or greater but less than 1 Gbps. That should start to change as more telcos begin to upgrade to networks offering speeds up to 1 Gbps.

Still, at the moment, 82 percent of U.S. homes have access to speeds in excess of 100 megabits per second, while in Europe, only two percent of the population has access to these speeds, Comcast notes.

The availability of 100 Mbps to 1 Gbps Internet access services grew the fastest, from 2010 to 2012, according to a new study by the  National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA). Though growing from a low base, availability of 1-Gbps services grew nearly 300 percent between 2010 and 2012.

Availability fo 100 Mbps services grew even more: 448 percent between 2010 and 2012. Availability of 50 Mbps services grew 160 percent between 2010 and 2012.

Services operating at 25 Mbps, arguably the speeds most consumers tend to buy, grew about 57 percent, in terms of availability.

Availability of lower-speed services has reached virtual ubiquity. Some 98 percent of U.S. residents can buy Internet access at speeds of 3 Mbps or greater and upload speeds of 768 kbps or greater.

About 91 percent of U.S. residents can buy access at 10 Mbps downstream. Some 78 percent can buy access services operating at 25 Mbps downstream.

Also, about 81 percent of U.S. residents can buy mobile broadband access at speeds of 6 Mbps or greater.

And nearly 26 percent of the population can buy fixed wireless service with download speeds at 6 Mbps.

Up to this point, cable operators have been the primary providers of high speed access services of at least 25 Mbps or greater but less than 1 Gbps. That should start to change as more telcos begin to upgrade to networks offering speeds up to 1 Gbps.

Still, at the moment, 82 percent of U.S. homes have access to speeds in excess of 100 megabits per second, while in Europe, only two percent of the population has access to these speeds, Comcast notes.
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