Someday 100 Mbps Will Not Qualify as "Broadband"

easonable people will differ about the value of changing the definition of broadband from time to time. When definitions are changed, though, it becomes more difficult to track progress, even if higher minimum definitions are indirect proof that speeds are increasing, across the board.

Three decades ago, in the U.S. market, “broadband” was, by definition, any speed faster than 1.5 Mbps. A decade and a half ago, fiber to the home meant symmetrical 10 Mbps speeds. These days, anything below 25 Mbps is not even “broadband.”

Someday, even 100 Mbps might not be considered “broadband.” It just depends on adoption of speeds in the gigabit range, on both fixed and mobile networks.





Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Spectrum Fees, High Incremental Capex, Lower Value in Ecosystem Mean Historic Changes Might be Necessary

For Ting, Operating Costs are Key to Business Model

Lower FTTH Costs Improve the Business Model, But How Much?