"Broadband" Now is Subjective

There is no single global standard for “broadband” or “high speed” access, although such matters once were a matter of global standards. These days, the definitions are subjective.

For analysts at Ovum, “broadband” means a minimum speed of 10 Mbps.

For the U.S. Federal Communications Commission, “broadband” requires a minimum of 25 Mbps. Regulators in each country might propose a different number.

Ovum also argues that, in addition to a download speed of at least 10Mbps, broadband  requires a “stable and reliable network that delivers content with a wait time of no more than three seconds.”

Ovum also sees non-technical attributes as important, including “outstanding customer service that can resolve most customer issues at the first point of contact.”

By adding quality of service mechanisms--including those which are not technology related--Ovum shows the new world we are in.

We no longer can uniformly describe what “broadband” is, as an experience or product.
Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Voice Usage and Texting Trends Headed in Opposite Directions

Spectrum Fees, High Incremental Capex, Lower Value in Ecosystem Mean Historic Changes Might be Necessary

For Ting, Operating Costs are Key to Business Model