OTT Video Service Launches Escalate

Over the top video subscription service launches are becoming much more common. 

In November 2014, Rogers Communications and Shaw Communications jointly launched shomi, a Canadian subscription video on-demand (SVOD) OTT video service offering a mix of U.S.- and Canadian-produced content.


One month later, Bell Canada launched its own OTT SVOD service, CraveTV.  In December, U.S. satellite pay-TV provider DIRECTV launched Yaveo, a Spanish-language OTT video service, according to Parks Associates.


In January 2015 FOXTEL and content producer Seven West Media introduced Presto TV. The same month, Australian joint venture StreamCo unveiled its Stan SVOD streaming service. Netflix launched in Australia in March 2015.


Also in January, Star India released a beta version of Hotstar, an ad-supported video streaming service, while retailer Carrefour launched a new OTT video service in France.


In February 2015, Dish Network introduced Sling TV.


In March PlayStation Vue was launched by Sony and Nickelodeon premiered Noggin, a mobile-oriented subscription video service designed for children, while CONtv launched a comic book oriented service.


In April, HBO launched “HBO Now.”


SingTel, Sony, and Warner Bros. announced plans to create a new service, HOOQ, for the Asian market, including the Philippines, India, and Thailand.


Online retailer Overstock.com says it will launch a video service in the U.S. market in 2015.


InfiniTV is set to launch later in 2015 in Brazil, with both subscription and transactional options.


Samsung launched an OTT service in Brazil, Moony, that provides free and subscription-based access to linear TV channels.

All of that activity is one reason why global OTT video service subscription revenues will increase from nearly $9 billion in 2014 to over $19 billion in 2019, according to Parks Associates.
Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Voice Usage and Texting Trends Headed in Opposite Directions

Korea Telecom Sees New Value from Fixed Network

Someday 100 Mbps Will Not Qualify as "Broadband"