Wednesday, July 24, 2013

OneGigabit in Vancouver, B.C.

OneGigabit in Vancouver, BC is the latest ISP to announce it is going to provide 1-Gbps Internet access connections, focusing as many other ISPs are on targeted deployments.

OneGigabit plans to provide service on a wholesale basis only (no direct retail sales) to apartments, condominiums and office buildings throughout the Vancouver metro area, using a combination of optical fiber and microwave radio operating in the 24, 38 and 80 GHz frequency bands.

Also, as many other ISPs are doing, OneGigabit is partnering to build its network, in this case doing wholesale deals with building owners.

The 1 Gbps FTTH service is available for apartment and condominium buildings located within 20 kilometers of downtown, with pre-existing Ethernet cable from each suite to a basement wiring demarcation point.

OneGigabit also assists property owners with the process and costs involved in upgrading a building’s premises wiring for optical fiber access throughout the building. OneGigabit also works with new building owners to install optical distribution networks within the structures.

OneGigabit's plan is to negotiate with real estate owners, managers and developers and hook up entire small and medium-sized apartments, condominiums and office buildings that don't currently have an optical fiber connection.

Where that is not possible, OneGigabit is planning to use microwave radio as an alternative, using Ubiquiti “AirFiber” systems.




“Even if your building is located too far from the nearest source of underground fiber to make a fiber-optic connection economical, OneGigabit's rooftop mounted high-capacity microwave systems can provide access at 2 Gbps speeds at any location within a 15 kilometer to 20 km radius of the downtown core,” the company says.

According to OneGigabit, the wireless network can transmit data at up to two gigabits per second over distances of up to eight kilometers.

The firm basically has a “fiber to the basement” or “fiber to the building” business plan, and apparently will try to share access costs with building owners.

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